Why flickr won’t be selling my photos

20141202-featured20141218A welcome update/retraction from flickr 

If you are a flickr member you may have seen at least one of these high profile commentaries about flickr’s recent shenanigans:


Thomas Hawk: The Controversy Around flickr Selling Creative Commons Licensed Photos

Cnet: Some photographers bristle over Flickr’s selling of photos

PetaPixel: Flickr Taking Heat from CC Photographers for Selling Their Work as Wall Art Without Compensation

“More than 300 million publicly shared Flickr images use Creative Commons licenses, making it the largest content partner. Yahoo last week said it would begin selling prints of 50 million Creative Commons-licensed images as well as an unspecified number of other photos handpicked from Flickr.” –WSJ

The default license on flickr is “©All Rights Reserved”, unless you change your default license to one of the Creative Commons Licenses which allows others to use your uploaded photos. Since signing up in 2006, at least 99% of my images have been tagged either © or licensed under a BY-NC-ND Creative Commons License (the same license in my site’s sidebar) and therefore, thankfully, not eligible for this new “feature.”

“Yahoo says it is complying with the terms of Creative Commons by selling only images that permit commercial use.” -WSJ

While there may be nothing illegal about what flickr is doing with images that have a Creative Commons “Attribution” License**, there is a very wide moral chasm  between an individual ordering a printed wall art image from their own photostream and flickr offering those same images for sale to 3rd parties.

Come on flickr! Don’t be that guy.*

(*from the flickr “Community Guidelines“)

** Just to clarify, the images being sold by flickr are any images that have a CC License that does not include the “Non-Commercial” clause, not just those that only have an “Attribution” License.

Photo101: Landmark


So many big and important places. This is a small landmark that has personal significance for me. Since I am sure that most of my visitors don’t read Hebrew, I’ll translate

The First Kiosk

My husband’s family came here in the very early 1900’s from Russia. My father-in-law (z”l) was born there while his younger brother (now 88) was born here. Both boys helped their mother run the kiosk after their father passed away suddenly. By the time my husband was born, the kiosk was long since gone, but the boulevard where it stood continues to be a shady and welcoming place for both old and young.

Photo101: Connect


This snapshot was taken on the morning of our last day in Amsterdam. My daughter, who I had not seen for a few months, and I were on our way to have breakfast before heading to the new wing of the Rijksmuseum. For me the shadow play was too hard to resist.

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The sandwich critique (a how to guide)


So far the Photo101 assignments have been interesting, certainly, but generally void of real critique. New followers and/or likes on our assignment posts can be an ego boost, but will those types of feedback help you grow as a photographer? blips posted a guide to critiquing your fellow Photo101 participants’ photos without falling into the trap of Minnesota “nice”. A worthy read.

Originally posted on blips blog:

Let me confess one thing right away; I have been scolded, trashed and even threatened for giving critique on a photo. Not for using a excuse but I’m Dutch (The Netherlands or Holland) it’s like a New Yorker that will tell you straight out and blunt what they think. After a lot of years now living in the US I came to understand that telling it straight out is not that much appreciated.  It’s the “How are you doing” greeting we use in Minnesota, nobody really wants to know that you feel crappy or sick or whatever, you always say something like “Fine, how about you” It’s a concept foreign to foreigners.

Ok so I did read up about this why people were so much upset with my critique because when I say the horizon is crooked, it is!

hamburger-critiqueI stumbled across the Sandwich technique people used to critique writers…

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