Why flickr won’t be selling my photos

20141202-featured20141218A welcome update/retraction from flickr 

If you are a flickr member you may have seen at least one of these high profile commentaries about flickr’s recent shenanigans:

Jeffrey Zeldman: WHAT’S WRONG WITH THIS PICTURE? FLICKR IS ABOUT TO SELL OFF YOUR CREATIVE COMMONS PHOTOS 

Thomas Hawk: The Controversy Around flickr Selling Creative Commons Licensed Photos

Cnet: Some photographers bristle over Flickr’s selling of photos

PetaPixel: Flickr Taking Heat from CC Photographers for Selling Their Work as Wall Art Without Compensation

More than 300 million publicly shared Flickr images use Creative Commons licenses, making it the largest content partner. Yahoo last week said it would begin selling prints of 50 million Creative Commons-licensed images as well as an unspecified number of other photos handpicked from Flickr. –WSJ

The default license on flickr is “©All Rights Reserved”, unless you change your default license to one of the Creative Commons Licenses which allows others to use your uploaded photos. Since signing up in 2006, at least 99% of my images have been tagged either © or licensed under a BY-NC-ND Creative Commons License (the same license in my site’s sidebar) and therefore, thankfully, not eligible for this new “feature.”

Yahoo says it is complying with the terms of Creative Commons by selling only images that permit commercial use. -WSJ

While there may be nothing illegal about what flickr is doing with images that have a Creative Commons “Attribution” License**, there is a very wide moral chasm  between an individual ordering a printed wall art image from their own photostream and flickr offering those same images for sale to 3rd parties.

Come on flickr! Don’t be that guy.*

(*from the flickr “Community Guidelines“)

** Just to clarify, the images being sold by flickr are any images that have a CC License that does not include the “Non-Commercial” clause, not just those that only have an “Attribution” License.

So it goes

derailed-featured-IMG_7120Like a coin on a railroad track, Life has a funny way of jumping up and derailing our best intentions. My focus at the moment is about 4,500 kilometers from me. I’ll continue to post Photo101’s when and if I have available time. See you when I do. Thanks for stopping by. (As a real aside, apparently Google Maps lives in an alternate reality where I can simply get on the highway and drive for 50 hours from where I am to where I need to be, barring geopolitical conflicts and all. )

The sandwich critique (a how to guide)

JenT:

So far the Photo101 assignments have been interesting, certainly, but generally void of real critique. New followers and/or likes on our assignment posts can be an ego boost, but will those types of feedback help you grow as a photographer? blips posted a guide to critiquing your fellow Photo101 participants’ photos without falling into the trap of Minnesota “nice”. A worthy read.

Originally posted on blips blog:

Let me confess one thing right away; I have been scolded, trashed and even threatened for giving critique on a photo. Not for using a excuse but I’m Dutch (The Netherlands or Holland) it’s like a New Yorker that will tell you straight out and blunt what they think. After a lot of years now living in the US I came to understand that telling it straight out is not that much appreciated.  It’s the “How are you doing” greeting we use in Minnesota, nobody really wants to know that you feel crappy or sick or whatever, you always say something like “Fine, how about you” It’s a concept foreign to foreigners.

Ok so I did read up about this why people were so much upset with my critique because when I say the horizon is crooked, it is!

hamburger-critiqueI stumbled across the Sandwich technique people used to critique writers…

View original 535 more words

Interlude: Why Mobile?

During our long trip abroad to Norway and Germany at the end of May (was it only in May?!) I took the opportunity to upgrade my failing 3 year-old smartphone, a Samsung Galaxy Ace, to a much newer Galaxy S4 with more memory and a higher resolution screen and camera. My phone now has a higher resolution camera than my Canon PowerShot S100.

If I look at my photographing trends over the past 2 years, I seem to have become a point-and-shoot photographer, for good or bad, but it does force me to ask the question of why I carry around 2 cameras when heading out. I can almost compare it to why I drive a car with an automatic shift as opposed to a stick shift. It lets me concentrate on what’s happening around me without needing to set up my camera for each scene, which usually escapes me by the time I’m ready to shoot with manual settings. When talking about snapshot photography, does it really matter whether the photo was taken with a high-end DSLR or a high-end Lumix cameraphone?

Each camera has its strengths and weaknesses and, of course, there are things that a point-and-shoot just cannot do because of the lens (although that may be changing). Again using the car analogy, I know I’ll never win the Grand Prix with my Toyota, but then again I’m not trying to. I’m just trying for the best shot I can get with the camera I have in hand. Ultimately I think that is what most photographers try to do.

PS just a reminder that “Likes” are turned off on this site. If you’d rather not leave a comment, do feel free to rank my posts/photos instead. Thanks!

Pick a Size-Gallery Updated!

Another subtle update to the Gallery feature has been pushed out. This update brings to the Edit Gallery screen the ability to select image size, which was previously available only by directly editing the Gallery shortcode in the Text tab of the Post or Page Editor.

When you open the Media Manager’s Edit Gallery screen, beyond Link to, Columns, Random Order and Type, you’ll now see an additional drop down menu which allows you to select Gallery image size- Thumbnail, Medium, Large or Full Size. While I have not had an opportunity to experiment with all the Gallery Types, in the past these image size choices have been relevant only for the default Thumbnail Gallery and not the “mosaic” type of Gallery.

Your image size selection should also influence the number of columns you select to use. If your theme has a particularly narrow posting column or even a full-page template, you may need to experiment a bit with image size and number of columns to get the best result for your theme.

And here’s the bonus: you can now easily insert even a single image which will be displayed in a Gallery and then, by default, the Photo Carousel. If you wish to align your single image to the left or right and have text wrap around it, you’ll still have to get your feet wet in the Text tab of the Editor, but it’s a grand start!

Pics or It Didn’t Happen: The New Crisis of Connected Cameras – Atlantic

In days or weeks, when the United States again drops bombs on the Islamic State, it will commence its first war shaped and driven by networked photography—the twinned phenomena of ubiquitous, Internet-connected cameras to take pictures and screens to view them. The gruesome video of ISIS militants executing U.S. journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff seems to have upended American public opinion, and now even almost-isolationist politicians have embraced intervention abroad.

Right now, almost every major news story turns on a single set of unresolved ethical questions: What should we do about the new proliferation of cameras? What should we do when the images they capture wind up on the Internet?

It is a debate about a distinctly new technological phenomenon, and we can see aspects of it everywhere: from the imminent war against ISIS to the leaked nude images of female celebrities; from the proposal of police body-cams to the NFL’s treatment of domestic abuser Ray Rice.

via Pics or It Didn’t Happen: The New Crisis of Connected Cameras
(Featured Image courtesy of Pasu Au Yeung on flickr, released under a Creative Commons BY-SA 2.0 License)

If you look at this year’s Photokina windup, it seems camera manufacturers are finally responding to the demand for DSLR cameras that are connected to the network. This article from the Atlantic takes a pointed look at the ethics involved when shooting with networked devices with a lens.

“With great power must come great responsibility,”-Voltaire

(Bonus: click through and read “Goodbye, Cameras” which, for camera buffs, is as interesting and thought-provoking as the main article.)

Have you ever taken a photo only to stop yourself from uploading it to a publicly accessible website? What made you question your initial decision?