Pics or It Didn’t Happen: The New Crisis of Connected Cameras – Atlantic

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In days or weeks, when the United States again drops bombs on the Islamic State, it will commence its first war shaped and driven by networked photography—the twinned phenomena of ubiquitous, Internet-connected cameras to take pictures and screens to view them. The gruesome video of ISIS militants executing U.S. journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff seems to have upended American public opinion, and now even almost-isolationist politicians have embraced intervention abroad.

Right now, almost every major news story turns on a single set of unresolved ethical questions: What should we do about the new proliferation of cameras? What should we do when the images they capture wind up on the Internet?

It is a debate about a distinctly new technological phenomenon, and we can see aspects of it everywhere: from the imminent war against ISIS to the leaked nude images of female celebrities; from the proposal of police body-cams to the NFL’s treatment of domestic abuser Ray Rice.

via Pics or It Didn’t Happen: The New Crisis of Connected Cameras
(Featured Image courtesy of Pasu Au Yeung on flickr, released under a Creative Commons BY-SA 2.0 License)

If you look at this year’s Photokina windup, it seems camera manufacturers are finally responding to the demand for DSLR cameras that are connected to the network. This article from the Atlantic takes a pointed look at the ethics involved when shooting with networked devices with a lens.

“With great power must come great responsibility,”-Voltaire

(Bonus: click through and read “Goodbye, Cameras” which, for camera buffs, is as interesting and thought-provoking as the main article.)

Have you ever taken a photo only to stop yourself from uploading it to a publicly accessible website? What made you question your initial decision?