Pics or It Didn’t Happen: The New Crisis of Connected Cameras – Atlantic

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In days or weeks, when the United States again drops bombs on the Islamic State, it will commence its first war shaped and driven by networked photography—the twinned phenomena of ubiquitous, Internet-connected cameras to take pictures and screens to view them. The gruesome video of ISIS militants executing U.S. journalists James Foley and Steven Sotloff seems to have upended American public opinion, and now even almost-isolationist politicians have embraced intervention abroad.

Right now, almost every major news story turns on a single set of unresolved ethical questions: What should we do about the new proliferation of cameras? What should we do when the images they capture wind up on the Internet?

It is a debate about a distinctly new technological phenomenon, and we can see aspects of it everywhere: from the imminent war against ISIS to the leaked nude images of female celebrities; from the proposal of police body-cams to the NFL’s treatment of domestic abuser Ray Rice.

via Pics or It Didn’t Happen: The New Crisis of Connected Cameras
(Featured Image courtesy of Pasu Au Yeung on flickr, released under a Creative Commons BY-SA 2.0 License)

If you look at this year’s Photokina windup, it seems camera manufacturers are finally responding to the demand for DSLR cameras that are connected to the network. This article from the Atlantic takes a pointed look at the ethics involved when shooting with networked devices with a lens.

“With great power must come great responsibility,”-Voltaire

(Bonus: click through and read “Goodbye, Cameras” which, for camera buffs, is as interesting and thought-provoking as the main article.)

Have you ever taken a photo only to stop yourself from uploading it to a publicly accessible website? What made you question your initial decision?

Bergen-Gateway to the Fjords

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Our trip to Norway at the end of May has already acquired a dreamlike quality even if it was only two months ago. Revisiting our vacation pictures helps me remember that there are places in the world where the hottest topic of conversation is the weather. And occasionally Norway did make me feel like I was back in Minnesota, not least of all because it seemed all the young folk we met had a very Minnesotan accent in English.

Our first day’s travel included 3 different flights over 9 hours, Tel Aviv to Vienna, Vienna to Oslo, Oslo to Bergen. The last leg may have been the shortest, but thanks to a delayed flight from Vienna, we had 35 minutes to make our connection to Bergen after collecting our luggage for Customs; the boarding gate, perversely, was the furthest from the in-transit check-in counter. A mad dash ensued and, thankfully, both we and our luggage made it.

The older sections of Bergen, or more correctly Bryggen, is where the German Hanseatic League had a trading enclave for 400 years, the main product from Bryggen being dried North Sea cod or Stockfish. The wooden buildings where the fish were processed were in constant danger of burning down and the one housing the Hanseatic Museum was rebuilt after the fire in 1702.

We only had one full day in Bergen and used this guide as a starting point. Fortunately, the older part of Bergen is compact enough that we could cover it in a day.

More to come…