Photo101: Water

Oh, water! I suppose I could have posted one of my Norwegian fjord or waterfall pictures from May, but I’m really trying to keep up with the spirit of Photo101 and snap new photos as a part of the assignments. If nothing else, it is really forcing me to look for “photo ops” during my limited free time while travelling to work or home. (Maybe it should be called Photo101 Scavenger Hunt!)

While we had rain overnight, by the time I was out and about most of it was in the process of drying up. So here’s my photo for today’s assignment, Water.

image
9.3MB straight from the Camera (4128×3096); 14.6MB (Holy Cow!) after editing in Pixlr Express (same dimensions as original) and 2MB after uploading to WPcom (1600 px on the long side).

I’ve cheated just a bit today though. I’m creating my post online from the WPcom Dashboard rather than my phone since I’m so pressed for time, but the photo was edited in Pixlr Express, uploaded and inserted via my phone.

PS just a reminder that “Likes” are turned off on this site. If you’d rather not leave a comment, do feel free to rank my posts/photos instead. Thanks!

One Image 3 Ways

Gilboa Iris

A week ago we signed up for a free, Friday morning field trip to Mt. Gilboa with the Jewish National Fund. I’d been waiting very impatiently since our day trip several weeks ago to the same area because it was too early and there wasn’t a single Gilboa Iris to be seen. When Friday morning rolled around, we woke up to a downpour with black, thundering skies overhead. A call in to the KKL Forest Hot Line to check whether the field trip was on came back with a resounding yes, but… “it might be a good idea to bring boots and an umbrella”. The further north we drove, the more intense the rain became. It was only as we turned east and passed into the Jezreel Valley that the rains began to subside and blue skies began to poke out between the clouds. By the time we reached the meeting point at the foot of Mt. Gilboa, there were mostly blue skies overhead.

Our first stop on Mt. Gilboa was to a bluff called Mt. Shaul and the wonderful panorama above. Here, too, there were wildflowers blooming everywhere, including some I had never seen before.

But the highlight of the trip was almost a half hour away, on the other side of the mountain, the Gilboa Iris. Once numerous, blooming in stands over a wide area of the top of the Gilboa near the now almost ironically named “Iris Path”, the flowers are now mostly found in a few secluded pockets at the far east side of the Gilboa in an area near Malkishua.

Everyone on this field trip was there to see this flower. Like the majority of Israeli wildflowers, the Gilboa Iris is a protected species. So with cameras and phone cameras in hand, we spent quite some time photographing them from every angle and then walked back to our cars, about 3/4 kilometer away. Once back in our car, I flipped through the photos I’d taken and noticed that my best picture unfortunately included someone’s foot. What to do?!

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Back home and photos downloaded to my computer, I powered up PSE11 and went to work. Every attempt to surgically remove the foot from the photo left me unhappy with the outcome. Then I tried a close crop and to my eye it was the better choice.

I’d really be interested to know how you deal with your photographic near, or even far, misses. Have you taken that “almost” perfect photo that needed more than just a touch-up to salvage it?