Bergen-Gateway to the Fjords

bergen-featured

Our trip to Norway at the end of May has already acquired a dreamlike quality even if it was only two months ago. Revisiting our vacation pictures helps me remember that there are places in the world where the hottest topic of conversation is the weather. And occasionally Norway did make me feel like I was back in Minnesota, not least of all because it seemed all the young folk we met had a very Minnesotan accent in English.

Our first day’s travel included 3 different flights over 9 hours, Tel Aviv to Vienna, Vienna to Oslo, Oslo to Bergen. The last leg may have been the shortest, but thanks to a delayed flight from Vienna, we had 35 minutes to make our connection to Bergen after collecting our luggage for Customs; the boarding gate, perversely, was the furthest from the in-transit check-in counter. A mad dash ensued and, thankfully, both we and our luggage made it.

The older sections of Bergen, or more correctly Bryggen, is where the German Hanseatic League had a trading enclave for 400 years, the main product from Bryggen being dried North Sea cod or Stockfish. The wooden buildings where the fish were processed were in constant danger of burning down and the one housing the Hanseatic Museum was rebuilt after the fire in 1702.

We only had one full day in Bergen and used this guide as a starting point. Fortunately, the older part of Bergen is compact enough that we could cover it in a day.

More to come…

Interesting Times

8614080190_e0f340ccb4_o

As the old photographer’s adage goes, the best camera is the one that you always have with you.

Since its invention in the late 1950’s, the Single Lens Reflex (SLR) pentaprism camera has been the workhorse of the professional photography industry, thanks to its ability to accurately reproduce the view of the lens through the eyepiece as well as for its changeable lens design.

In the early 1990s the SLR got a digital upgrade from its 35mm roots by replacing the mechanical film system with a digitizer back.

Since then, the digital-SLR (DSLR) has evolved to become the platform of choice for many pros and prosumers as developments in digital photography have also improved with each successive generation, such as pixel density and sensor size, faster autofocus motors, stabilized lenses and more advanced signal processing chips, as well as the ability to shoot video.

Read more at Yes, smartphones have killed the DSLR | ZDNet.

It certainly has been an interesting week for photographers. Lots of talk around the web of how standalone cameras are becoming have become secondary to smartphones (deja vu, anyone?). And now it looks like the Nokia 1020 has hit several more nails into the digital camera coffin, let alone film cameras. (hat tip to warptest) If you want to read the full specs, Nokia has published a white paper (PDF) with all the technical details on their newest, dare I say it, phone.

4842840757_d227d2e8a2_qArticles like the one above from ZDNet, and this one from Mother Jones, will most certainly engage photographers of all sorts in discussions over the nature of photography and what makes a photograph. Perhaps the day is already here when the experience of standing in a darkened room with the acrid, vinegary smell of developing agents is gone or left to a dwindling number of people interested in esoterica. (It’s been nearly 35 years since I last developed my own film, but I can still smell the darkroom.) Personally, I find posting film photographs on sites like flickr and 500px the ultimate irony.

So what drives what? Is the fall of film/digital cameras due to the demands of the consumer in an increasingly digital world or has the paradigm just shifted to embrace the current axiom? What are we losing, if anything, by the shift from film camera to digital camera to camera phone?

(Image Attribution: The featured image appearing in this post courtesy of Kurt Torster on flickr and released under a CC BY-ND 2.0 License and the inset photo appearing here courtesy of Thomas Prenner on flickr and released under a CC BY-SA 2.0 License)

Tips for Taking Fireworks Photos with Your Smartphone

IMG_3347copy

JenT:

IMG_3347copyHappy 4th of July to all my American friends! (Someone please light a sparkler for me.) :)

Originally posted on Tech:

Watching the July 4th fireworks has been a long-standing family tradition. But, capturing the beautiful aerial displays can be hard if you stick with the auto settings on your smartphone. So, try these simple tricks for fireworks photos you’ll want to keep.

1. Use a tripod

When you take picture of fireworks, your phone’s camera needs to hold the shutter open long enough to “see” the fireworks. The longer the shutter is open, the more susceptible your photo is to motion blur. So use a tripod to make sure there’s no movement. Joby’s GripTight Gorillapod, which can wrap around trees and poles or stand up on the ground, is a great option that fits most smartphones. Price: $29.95 on joby.com or Amazon

2. Use the “landscape” mode

Your camera automatically tries to find an object on which to focus. And when presented with a black featureless sky, the camera doesn’t…

View original 277 more words